Thursday, 31 July 2014

Free Parking

Last week on Wednesday when I took Mike to his bath appointment at the hospital, there was no parking in the free, ten minute drop-off zone in front of the building where we usually park, so I drove around to the back. We have parked in the back a few times before, but not only is it all pay parking, there is only one wheelchair spot. Thankfully, the one wheelchair parking spot was available and for the sake of the five or ten minutes it takes me to drop Mike off, I wasn’t going to worry about paying for parking.

As I was getting Mike out of the van, I could see a couple that looked a little lost walking toward us. It was a beautiful older Indo-Canadian couple in bright coloured clothing, each walking with a cane. The man came right up to the van and asked if I knew where he could pay for parking. His accent was lovely, but his english a little rough, so there was some confusion when he also showed me the map of where in the hospital they had to go.

I pointed him in the direction of the entrance where the parking machine is and I told him we were going that way and I would help him. He and his wife started walking toward the entrance while I got Mike out of the van. We caught up to them and went in together and I showed him the parking machine. He told me his parking stall number and I punch it in along with the amount of time he wanted. I told him it was $6 and he pulled out a bunch of change from his pocket. He had a toonie and two loonies and a bunch of dimes, so I took the four bigger coins out of his hand and grabbed two loonies of my own and put the money in and gave him his ticket. He wasn’t about to accept my money and insisted I take all of his dimes. He showed me his map again of where he and his wife had to go, so we walked them to the elevator and I explained to them that they needed to go up one floor and then when they got out of the elevator, they needed to turn right and follow the hall to reception. They thanked us very much and we parted ways.

Yesterday when I picked Mike up from his bath appointment, we passed a man in the hall talking to medical personnel. I told Mike it looked like the man from last week and continued to our vehicle parked in the free, drop off zone in the front of the building. As I was wheeling Mike backwards up the ramp into the van, the tall, well dressed man with a bright blue turban appeared. He tapped his hand on the outside of one thigh a few times and with a big smile said his wife had her surgery and it went well. I said that was great and told him we were happy to hear it. He said, “Do you remember me?” I said we did; Mike nodded. He pointed to Mike and said, “What about him?” I told the man Mike was ill and that he probably wasn’t going to get better. The man came closer and with his finger pointing up, he said, “God is supreme!” Mike and I nodded in agreement. He said it again and then told us if we pray every morning and every night, everything would be alright. We nodded in agreement and the man said good bye and walked away.

As we drove off, I got a little choked up and glanced at Mike in the rear view mirror. He was already smiling at me - I smiled back and thought how God is very mysterious but He keeps it so simple at the same time.






1 comment:

  1. I have read your blog from time to time and wanted to thank you for sharing your journey with ALS. My husband was diagnosed a year ago in June. I am struggling with the idea of home care and can relate to your blog about looking like everything is OK on the outside but falling apart on the inside.

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